"Gone Girl" (2014) | Movie vs. Book

"Gone Girl" (2014) | Movie vs. Book

Yesterday le husband and I went to check out Gone Girl, which is a movie I have been excited for pretty much ever since I heard it was in the works. I read the book back in 2012, and really enjoyed it (you can read my review here), but when I heard David Fincher was directing and Ben Affleck was attached as Nick Dunne, I knew this was going to be an amazing film. Needless to say, I loved the movie, and if you want to hear more about that, watch my video below. However, in this post I wanted to talk about the few differences between the book and the movie, so if you've seen the film or read the book, and are curious about how the two compare—keep reading!

I always say there are sacrifices that need to be made when a book is being adapted to screen, but in this case I felt like it was the closest adaptation I've seen thus far. Imagine my surprise when I kept seeing people say "whoa, different ending!"—I thought I was losing my mind. Apparently, people are sensitive to details. Let me put your mind at ease: the ending is the same, it's just presented a little differently (and honestly, I think the movie presentation of it made more sense, as far as tying up the story goes). Here are some small changes, in no particular order, that did stick out to me as I was watching the film:

Obviously, massive spoilers ahead

  1. Amy's "fear of blood": In the book, Amy invents this massive fear of blood so that she isn't suspected to have cut herself after she has gone missing. This is really a small change, but it's emphasized quite a bit in the book showing how far she has thought her plan through.
  2. Nick and Andie's breakup: In the movie Nick tells Andie he won't see her until it's safe, and some time later she randomly goes on record apologizing for the affair with a married man. In the book this makes a bit more sense: as per his lawyer's strong suggestion, Nick breaks up with Andie, to which she responds by biting him. Clearly, a mature individual.
  3. Desi's death: I have to give this one to the movie, where this scene was a lot more brutal and disturbing. In the book, Amy killing Desi is described after the fact: she drugs him and kills him—moving on. In the film we are given one of the most disturbing sex scenes that ends in a pool of blood.
  4. The missing clue: There is one more clue that comes up in the book, which was probably sacrificed for time purposes. Book readers will remember Nick's trip to Hannibal, Missouri, where he coincidentally took both Amy and Andie. 
  5. The interview at The Bar: Something that has been entirely cut from the movie is Nick's interview with Rebecca—a blogger, who catches him at The Bar and ends up getting a regretful husband speech. This ultimately helps Nick, because the interview influences the public opinion and sways it in his favor.

As you can see, all of these are small details that really didn't change the story or the outcome. There are also a lot of small nuances missing when it comes to Amy's elaborate lies, but I'm pretty sure everyone got the picture of what kind of person she was. Was there anything else that really stood out to you? Did any of the changes bother you?

Inspired by... "The Scorch Trials" and "The Death Cure"

Inspired by... "The Scorch Trials" and "The Death Cure"

Inspired by... "We Were Liars"

Inspired by... "We Were Liars"